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Clearwater Brain Injury Attorney

A traumatic brain injury, often abbreviated to TBI, is a form of brain injury that occurs when sudden trauma causes damage to the brain. There are four primary types of traumatic brain injuries:

  1. The most minor type of TBI, a concussion occurs when the brain is shaken inside the skull during an impact or sudden movement.
  2. Brain contusion. This is caused by bruising of the brain tissue, which occurs when small blood vessels in the brain leak or break.
  3. Penetrating brain injuries. A penetrating brain injury is when an object pierces through the skull.
  4. Anoxic brain injuries. This type of TBI occurs when the brain does not receive enough oxygen to operate properly, leading to the death of cells within the brain.

The symptoms of a TBI vary depending on the type. Someone who is suffering from a concussion might experience symptoms like nausea, dizziness, or slurred speech, while an injury caused by a blood clot in the brain might not have obvious or immediate symptoms.

In the United States, motor vehicle accidents account for 20% of all TBIs.  Other causes include

  • Falls
  • Physical assault
  • Sports injurie
  • Head and facial trauma

A TBI can have serious consequences. In 2010, TBIs lead to 50,000 deaths and 280,000 hospital visits. Men and those older than 65 are more likely to die from a TBI. A TBI can also increase the risk of other medical conditions, such as Alzheimer’s and epilepsy. It also contributes to depression, aggression, and personality changes. A TBI can also have a lifelong effect on:

  • Thinking
  • Sensation
  • Language
  • Balance
  • Communication
  • Memory

Symptoms

TBIs can impact a person’s mental, physical and cognitive abilities. Some symptoms, like dizziness after a concussion, may go away with treatment and rest, while others can be long-lasting or even permanent.

 

Mental Symptoms

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Feelings of apathy or loneliness
  • Sudden or unexpected changes in behavior, including aggression, irritability, impulsivity, and abnormal laughing or crying

 

Physical Symptoms

  • Dizziness
  • Fainting
  • Fatigue
  • Instability or stiff muscles
  • Blurred vision and sensitivity to light
  • Persistent headache
  • Loss of smell
  • Ringing in ears and sensitivity to sound
  • Slurred speech or speaking difficulty

 

Cognitive Symptoms

  • Amnesia
  • Inability to speak or understand language
  • Mental confusion
  • Concentration difficulties
  • Difficulty with thinking and understanding
  • Inability to create new memories
  • Inability to recognize common things

 

TBI Diagnosis

Recovering from a TBI can be a lengthy process, and the recovery time and prognosis depends on the severity of the injury. In cases involving concussions or other mild forms of TBIs, the injured person’s symptoms, like headaches and confusion, may go away within days or weeks. Others with more severe TBIs might suffer from issues like memory loss or behavioral problems that can affect them for months, years, or even permanently. In the most severe cases, a person with a TBI may be in a coma or medically induced coma, a minimally conscious state, or a vegetative state.

As someone recovers from a TBI, they may require physical, cognitive, or behavioral therapy to help them with any lingering symptoms, and the recovery process depends on the type of TBI and severity of their symptoms. In the two years after a TBI, many injured people show vast improvements and a decrease in disability. Many are able to return to the lives they were living before their TBI, though some adjustments may be required.

 

Common Misconceptions About TBI

Since there are so many different types of brain injuries and a wide variety of symptoms, there are also many myths and misconceptions about TBIs. Here are a few common misconceptions you might have heard about concussions and TBIs:

  • Misconception: If someone does not lose consciousness after an impact to the head, they do not have a TBI.
    • TBIs have many symptoms aside from loss of consciousness, and someone may be alert while still suffering from a serious brain injury.
  • Misconception: Only a direct impact to the head causes a TBI.
    • While many TBIs do occur due to direct blows to the head, like during a sports injury, they can also be caused by sudden movements, like whiplash during a car accident.
  • Misconception: Only athletes get TBIs.
    • Though sports can cause TBIs, they can also occur through car accidents, domestic violence, gun accidents, or other causes. Anyone can get a TBI.
  • Misconception: If someone has suffered from a head injury, you should keep them awake for 24 hours to monitor their condition.
    • Rest is actually critical for someone with a brain injury, so there is generally no need to keep someone awake after they suffer a blow to the head or other head injury

When discussing TBIs, it is important to focus on facts, rather than myths.

  • There are 235,000 hospitalizations due to TBIs each year
  • For children ages 14 and under, TBIs account for an estimated 37,000 hospitalizations and 2,685 death
  • Men make up 78.8% of all TBI victims
  • Out of every 100,000 TBIs each year, around 30 people die from their injury
  • Of those who die from a TBI, 50% do so within the first two hours of their injury
  • Each year, around 80,000 people experience the onset of long-term disabilities due to a TBI

Traumatic Brain Injury FAQs

What are the long-term effects of a traumatic brain injury?

A TBI can have many long-term effects that affect a person’s mental health, physical health, behavior, and cognitive abilities. These include:

  • Behavior changes, like aggression and anger
  • Depression and anxiety
  • Difficult understanding, speaking, or remembering
  • Inability to form new memories
  • Balance issues
  • Sensitivity to light or sound
  • Frequent or severe headaches

 

What is another name of a traumatic brain injury?

TBI covers a few different types of brain injuries, including concussions, brain contusions, penetrating brain injuries, and anoxic brain injuries. When someone suffers one of these injuries, it may be referred to by its specific name, or might simply be classified as a TBI.

 

What does TBI stand for?

TBI stands for traumatic brain injury.

 

What is TBI?

A traumatic brain injury, often abbreviated to TBI, is a form of brain injury that occurs when sudden trauma causes damage to the brain.

 

How many veterans suffer from TBIs?

Between 2000 and late 2019, the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center reported 414,000 TBIs among military service members in the United States, with most of those TBIs classified as mild.

 

How long does it take to recover from a traumatic brain injury?

The recovery process for a TBI depends on the severity of the injury. Someone with a mild concussion might easily recover after a few weeks of rest, while others may suffer from lifelong impairments or disabilities.

 

What qualifies as a traumatic brain injury?

A TBI is an injury that causes damage to the brain. There are four main types:

  • The most minor type of TBI, a concussion occurs when the brain is shaken inside the skull during an impact or sudden movement.
  • Brain contusion. This is caused by bruising of the brain tissue, which occurs when small blood vessels in the brain leak or break.
  • Penetrating brain injuries. A penetrating brain injury is when an object pierces through the skull.
  • Anoxic brain injuries. This type of TBI occurs when the brain does not receive enough oxygen to operate properly, leading to the death of cells within the brain.

 

What does a TBI do to the brain?

When someone suffers from a TBI, it can lead to changes in their brain chemistry. As a result, they may experience a range of mental, physical, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms, including:

  • Anxiety and depression
  • Behavioral changes
  • Frequent or severe headaches
  • Lack of balance or coordination
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty with speaking, understanding, or remembering

 

What is considered a mild TBI?

A concussion is the mildest type of TBI. This type of injury often occurs through sports injuries, but can also result from car accidents, falls, violent attacks, and other types of attacks.

 

What is the difference between an acquired brain injury and a traumatic brain injury?

An acquired brain injury is a brain injury that is not hereditary, congenital, degenerative, or caused by birth trauma. A TBI is a type of acquired brain injury, and non-traumatic causes of acquired brain injuries include strokes, tumors, and infectious diseases like meningitis.

 

What happens if a TBI is not treated?

When someone does not seek treatment for a TBI, they may experience symptoms like depression, behavioral changes, clumsiness and forgetfulness, and speech problems. This can impact their daily life, and may lead to lifelong problems if the TBI continues to go untreated.

 

How long should someone wait before drinking alcohol after suffering from a TBI?

After someone suffers from a TBI, they may become particularly sensitive to the effects of alcohol. Because drinking can increase the risks of car crashes, falls, and other accidents, people recovering from a TBI should avoid alcohol when possible, and cut down on their alcohol intake while recovering.

 

How does a TBI occur?

A TBI occurs when a sudden impact causes damage to the brain.

 

What is the best treatment for a TBI?

The best treatment for a TBI depends on the type and severity of the injury. Some people may require physical or cognitive therapy after a TBI, while others may recover with a few weeks of rest.

 

What is a severe traumatic brain injury?

Any type of TBI, even a concussion, can be severe. When a severe TBI occurs, the injured person may fall into a coma or be placed in a medically induced coma, or may be in a vegetative state. Severe TBIs can be fatal or cause permanent disabilities.

 

What are the types of TBIs?

There are four primary types of traumatic brain injuries:

  • The most minor type of TBI, a concussion occurs when the brain is shaken inside the skull during an impact or sudden movement.
  • Brain contusion. This is caused by bruising of the brain tissue, which occurs when small blood vessels in the brain leak or break.
  • Penetrating brain injuries. A penetrating brain injury is when an object pierces through the skull.
  • Anoxic brain injuries. This type of TBI occurs when the brain does not receive enough oxygen to operate properly, leading to the death of cells within the brain.

 

How long does it take for a TBI to heal?

The recovery process after a TBI depends on the severity of the injury. For someone with a concussion, they could resume their normal life within a few weeks, while others may take months or even years before they are able to function like they did before their injury. In other cases, people may suffer from permanent changes or impairments due to a TBI.

 

Treatment

There is little that can be done to reverse the initial brain damage. However, after an injury, immediate medical attention is needed for stabilization and prevention of further damage. When attending to someone with a TBI, the main concerns are making sure enough oxygen is getting to the brain, and maintaining blood flow and blood pressure. X-rays or CT scans check the severity of the injury and look for any spinal instability or fractures.

Following the initial treatment, a person with a TBI might need to see a physical therapist or an occupational therapist, or attend speech therapy, depending on the severity of their TBI.

After a TBI, medical needs can be very expensive. When combined with lost wages and daily pain or hardships, this makes life after a head injury very challenging. However, an alliance with an experienced brain injury attorney eases some of the stress.

Compensation

If you have suffered from a TBI or a loved one has suffered from a TBI, you may be entitled to compensation for your injuries. Along with the physical, mental, and cognitive symptoms, you or your loved one may also experience:

  • Time away from work
  • Lost wages
  • Loss of previously enjoyed activities
  • Loss of companionship if a loved one is severely injured or dies from a TBI
  • Medical bills
  • Other expenses, like home accommodations
  • Reduction in quality of life

 

If the TBI was caused by another person, like by a drunk driver or by unsafe workplace conditions, you may be able to find compensation for your losses with the help of an experienced TBI attorney.

Our Services

After you suffer from a TBI, or if a loved one suffers a TBI, you should seek medical attention, but you should also consider seeking the help of an experienced TBI attorney at Perenich, Caulfield, Avril, and Noyes P.A. If the TBI was caused by the negligent or reckless actions of another person, one of our attorneys can help you find the compensation and justice you deserve. During an initial consultation, our attorney will go over materials like medical records, the timeline of events, and a list of how the accident has impacted your life, and can help you come up with the best approach for seeking compensation. Additionally, they may be able to provide you with referrals to help you seek any extra medical treatment you may need while coping with you TBI or with your loved one’s TBI.

 

TBI cases can be complex, so it’s important to have someone on your side that has experience with personal injury law.

Perenich, Caulfield, Avril & Noyes (formerly Perenich & Carroll) was founded in 1955. We are exclusively invested in helping personal injury victims— and their loved ones — win compensation and to find justice. We approach every case with passion, experience, and dedication, and strive to provide the answers you need, when you need them.

If you are seeking the help of a brain injury attorney, please contact us. We’ll see you through.

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